Environment & Urbanization

World leading environmental and urban studies journal

Book notes

Urban Geopolitics aims to bring geopolitics into the mainstream of urban studies to enhance an understanding of cities as contested nexus points of social, spatial and political change.

The Act of Living is a life study of two men, 49-year-old Haile and 39-year-old Ibrahim, from Arada, Addis Ababa. Haile and Ibrahim grew up “in secure poverty”, in circumstances that meant they spent plenty of time on the streets from a young age.

South-South Development investigates the current resurgence of South-South collaboration (SSC), unleashed after the Forum on Chinese Africa Cooperation (FOCAC) summit in 2006.

Socially Engaged Art and the Neoliberal City explores how socially engaged art can influence and challenge how we live in, imagine and think about our cities – something that is increasingly dictated by neoliberal and technocratic visions.

Climate Change, Vulnerability and Migration explores the impact of climate change on migration, particularly on the socioeconomically poor who are disproportionately vulnerable and bear the worst impacts from climate change-related events.

The emerging megacity of the book’s title is Hyderabad, a quickly growing city of about 9 million people in the southern Indian state of Telangana.

Dead Labor attempts to conceptualize a political economy of premature death, arguing that this can be characterized by an emerging “necrocapitalism”. Under necrocapitalism, the social relations of capitalism condition premature death through the unequal commodification of living labour.

Tomatoes & Taxi Ranks is based on the findings from the Consuming Urban Poverty research project.

Social Sustainability, Climate Resilience and Community-Based Urban Development argues that built environments implemented according to a socially aware planning process can support pro-community behaviours that (1) contribute to daily social sustainability and (2) help strengthen climat

Future Cities is a philosophically and culturally wide-ranging look at the usefulness of imagined cities.

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