Environment & Urbanization

World leading environmental and urban studies journal

Book notes

Little Mogadishu is a historical and ethnographic work about the Eastleigh estate in the heart of Nairobi, Kenya. Thousands of Somali refugees have coalesced after being displaced by the war and have formed a thriving economy comprising shopping malls and hotels.

In Syria, seven years of conflict have been catastrophic. Thousands of qualified doctors and health workers have left since 2011. In neighbouring countries, informal employment among displaced Syrian health workers is broadly acknowledged.

This book draws on the author’s 40 years of research, consultancy and teaching on how best to tackle housing problems in the global South.

Small Is Necessary is a book-length argument for the premise, related to modern housing, “that coupling shared with small makes greatest social and ecological sense” (page 14).

Since 2010, the civil war in Syria has created one of the world’s greatest humanitarian crises. This paper aims to present possible entry points for links between humanitarian and development efforts in Aleppo, especially in the urban context.

Urban Mobilities in the Global South is an edited volume that presents case studies and empirical examples of transport planning and practice in the global South.

This working paper documents research carried out on the protection of internally displaced persons (IDPs) in urban communities in Somalia, providing an evidence base for improved humanitarian protection.

Over 60 per cent of the world’s refugees live in urban environments, but host governments often restrict their right to work, forcing urban refugees into precarious and often informal economy livelihoods.

What Works for Africa’s Poorest? is a collaborative work by Lawson, Ado-Kofie and Hulme, which highlights and learns from examples of development programmes in Africa, with specific attention to their effectiveness for the poorest of the poor.

This paper explores the faith context of displacement and settlement for the Sikh and Christian Afghan refugees and Muslim Rohingya refugees in Delhi.

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