Environment & Urbanization

World leading environmental and urban studies journal

Book notes

Access to land and shelter in Mogadishu is governed by a complex system of formal and informal mechanisms. While wealthier people can resort to bank loans and notaries to secure housing, for the city’s poor, displaced and vulnerable, finding shelter in informal settlements is more difficult.

Standing alongside Nairobi’s well-known slums are high-rise tenements and other “informal” housing types that contravene planning and building regulations.

Urban Design under Neoliberalism demonstrates how urban design practice in Santiago, Chile is characterized by neoliberal strategies.

Violence isn’t a straightforward concept. Mahadevia and Desai, in their chapter on everyday violence in the Indian cities of Ahmedabad and Guwahati, acknowledge that Indian cities don’t have the high levels of violence reported for certain cities in Latin America and Africa.

As the title of this book implies, the authors examine the growth of ecological farming and alternative food networks in China from two perspectives – those sponsored in a top down manner by the state and those arising from the bottom up through the efforts of farmers, organizers, consumers and o

This introductory guide, intended for city authorities, is practical and accessible. It’s full of policy recommendations, next steps, suggestions for further reading, short case studies, and simple graphics.

The historical context of Beijing Garbage dates back to imperial Beijing (pre-1913), when there was no problem of abundant solid waste. In the thrifty periods that followed, recycling was presented as a patriotic duty.

“India is in the process of a revolutionary urban transition” (page 1).

In For the War Yet to Come: Planning Beirut’s Frontiers, architect and planner Hiba Bou Akar describes how the spectre of anticipated war between sectarian groups informs spatial planning practices in Beirut, Lebanon.

Reversing Urban Inequality in Johannesburg investigates the ways that neoliberal urban policy produces sociospatial inequality in South Africa’s largest city.

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