Environment & Urbanization

World leading environmental and urban studies journal

Book notes

Following the Indian Ocean tsunami in 2004, Tamil Nadu lost about 8,000 people, and the lives and livelihoods of over 897,000 families were affected.

Lebanon’s urban spaces have been shaped by regional and national conflict. Basic services, including water provision, have long suffered from fractured urban planning and extensive informal urbanization.

In surveying how recent famines differ from those in previous eras, Mass Starvation makes some provocative points. One is that the incidence of modern famine is exaggerated, partly because of media cycles and political calculations.

Children driven from their homes — by conflict, poverty or other difficulties — are a particularly vulnerable group, with a range of urgent physical and emotional needs.

Space Invaders departs from the premise that “there is a geographical logic to all forms of protest” (page 1). To understand a range of recent protest movements, it uses a radical geography lens.

Policymakers and donors are calling for a paradigm shift in humanitarian response in urban areas: moving away from processes focused on individuals or households to approaches that intervene at a larger scale.

Au Niger, les inondations se situent en deuxième position des catastrophes naturelles après les sécheresses. Dans la ville de Niamey, l’arrondissement communal 5 situé sur la rive droite du fleuve Niger subit de façon régulière des dégâts liés à cette catastrophe.

There is increasing awareness of the importance of humanitarian agencies supporting and collaborating with local actors in order to restore city functions following humanitarian crises.

Ce rapport présente les résultats d’une enquête qualitative sur le phénomène du vigilantisme en Haïti.

The authors of Seeing like a City acknowledge their title has been used before, but they openly borrow it. The scholarship in this book presents “cities as forcing houses” (page 1).

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