Environment & Urbanization

World leading environmental and urban studies journal
E and U April 2019 cover detail


Current issue: Towards more inclusive climate change adaptation

Our understanding of climate change impacts and vulnerability in urban centres has grown rapidly in recent years, as has the number of cities developing and implementing plans to respond to the challenges of climate change. The papers in this issue explore such plans and responses in a variety of contexts and scales, from transnational networks for adaptation that incorporate Indonesian cities, to urban adaptation in the Solomon Islands and Vanuatu. Several papers explore the gendered aspects of adaptation (in Dar es Salaam, Tanzania and Khulna City, Bangladesh). Another zeroes in on the way urban migrants are particularly affected in India.

A common theme is attention to the informal settlements that are particularly exposed to climate-related hazards in cities. Another theme across the papers in this issue is the need for genuinely inclusive adaptation; one paper details the participatory planning processes in three small- to medium-sized Latin American cities.

Read more...

 

Book notes

Reversing Urban Inequality in Johannesburg investigates the ways that neoliberal urban policy produces sociospatial inequality in South Africa’s largest city. Johannesburg is a site of particular interest because of its historic legacy of apartheid and the resultant inequalities, and its contemporary post-apartheid commitment to redressing and ameliorating these inequalities.

It’s challenging, of course, to generalize scientists’ experiences across the entire African continent. Yet this book, based on a four-year study and over 250 interviews, draws out some commonalities among them, as well as some issues that are even more broadly applicable.

Latest blogs

Walking, cycling and using public transport are the main ways of getting around Indian cities. But as India's cities expand and car ownership increases, pedestrians are being marginalised – and their safety is being put at risk.
A paper in the latest issue of the journal Environment & Urbanization highlights how urban plans for adapting to climate change often leave out migrant populations living in informal settlements. Guest bloggers Eric Chu and Kavya Michael call for a rethink.
How far can ‘co-production’ improve the lives of the one in seven of the global population living in informal settlements without secure tenure or adequate access to services? Authors of the October 2018 issue of Environment and Urbanization (E&U) tackle this question by analysing the potentials and shortcomings of co-production.

E&U @SAGE journals

Sister journal

E&U's sister journal  Medio Ambiente y Urbanizacion focusses on Latin America

E & U Latin America