Environment & Urbanization

World leading environmental and urban studies journal
E and U October 2019 cover detail


Current issue: Getting food on the table in cities

Food policy debates have become increasingly sophisticated, reaching beyond a focus on food security and production to questions of quality, nutrition, affordability and inclusiveness. Yet this expansion of knowledge has largely not extended to urban areas. The current issue of Environment and Urbanization attempts to fill this gap with papers from Vietnam, Uganda, Canada, Haiti, Chile, Cambodia, Nepal and Namibia. These papers address the links between urban food and community building, gender, health, livelihoods and of course food security.

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Book notes

Overall, China has very few international migrants, who make up less than .1 per cent of the country’s population. A quarter of these are in Shanghai, and the urban master plan aims to increase their numbers several times over by 2035.

The city of Hawassa is growing fast, driven by the recent construction of a flagship industrial park that is expected to attract up to 60,000 workers by 2021. As the population expands, Hawassa’s shelter needs are becoming ever more acute: existing housing stock and government housing programmes and policies do not match demand. While informal settlements expand to absorb increasing demand from migrant workers and others, sustainable housing solutions are urgently needed for the city’s hundreds of thousands of residents.

Latest blogs

Food insecurity, malnutrition and obesity are increasingly becoming urban issues, affecting the health of millions of children and adults. The new issue of Environment & Urbanization looks at the wider context of urban food and nutrition security and the challenges for policymakers.
Poverty is often defined by assessing income. But guest bloggers Sam Jones and Inge Tvedten say that using a wider lens can help to understand the social and political mechanisms that help to create and reproduce poverty.
Walking, cycling and using public transport are the main ways of getting around Indian cities. But as India's cities expand and car ownership increases, pedestrians are being marginalised – and their safety is being put at risk.

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E&U's sister journal  Medio Ambiente y Urbanizacion focusses on Latin America

E & U Latin America