Environment & Urbanization

World leading environmental and urban studies journal
E and U October 2019 cover detail


Current issue: Getting food on the table in cities

Food policy debates have become increasingly sophisticated, reaching beyond a focus on food security and production to questions of quality, nutrition, affordability and inclusiveness. Yet this expansion of knowledge has largely not extended to urban areas. The current issue of Environment and Urbanization attempts to fill this gap with papers from Vietnam, Uganda, Canada, Haiti, Chile, Cambodia, Nepal and Namibia. These papers address the links between urban food and community building, gender, health, livelihoods and of course food security.

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Book notes

Urban Design under Neoliberalism demonstrates how urban design practice in Santiago, Chile is characterized by neoliberal strategies. It argues that urban design has been transformed by neoliberalism and its ethos has changed from designing good cities to reflecting capitalist profit-oriented objectives. Consequently, contemporary urban design benefits a select few at the expense of creating better spaces for the majority. Ultimately, the book argues that urban design under neoliberalism ought to be rejected.

Violence isn’t a straightforward concept. Mahadevia and Desai, in their chapter on everyday violence in the Indian cities of Ahmedabad and Guwahati, acknowledge that Indian cities don’t have the high levels of violence reported for certain cities in Latin America and Africa. Yet they refer to the less direct structural violence, where social structures or institutions, rather than individuals or groups, can cause harm through deprivation.

Latest blogs

Poverty is often defined by assessing income. But guest bloggers Sam Jones and Inge Tvedten say that using a wider lens can help to understand the social and political mechanisms that help to create and reproduce poverty.
Walking, cycling and using public transport are the main ways of getting around Indian cities. But as India's cities expand and car ownership increases, pedestrians are being marginalised – and their safety is being put at risk.
A paper in the latest issue of the journal Environment & Urbanization highlights how urban plans for adapting to climate change often leave out migrant populations living in informal settlements. Guest bloggers Eric Chu and Kavya Michael call for a rethink.

E&U @SAGE journals

Sister journal

E&U's sister journal  Medio Ambiente y Urbanizacion focusses on Latin America

E & U Latin America