Environment & Urbanization

World leading environmental and urban studies journal
E and U October 2019 cover detail


Current issue: Getting food on the table in cities

Food policy debates have become increasingly sophisticated, reaching beyond a focus on food security and production to questions of quality, nutrition, affordability and inclusiveness. Yet this expansion of knowledge has largely not extended to urban areas. The current issue of Environment and Urbanization attempts to fill this gap with papers from Vietnam, Uganda, Canada, Haiti, Chile, Cambodia, Nepal and Namibia. These papers address the links between urban food and community building, gender, health, livelihoods and of course food security.

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Book notes

Access to land and shelter in Mogadishu is governed by a complex system of formal and informal mechanisms. While wealthier people can resort to bank loans and notaries to secure housing, for the city’s poor, displaced and vulnerable, finding shelter in informal settlements is more difficult. In these overcrowded and underserviced parts of the city, access to shelter is controlled by "gatekeepers", who operate in an opaque system and control access to housing, services and humanitarian aid. People with few resources must rely on their personal connections to find a place to live.

Standing alongside Nairobi’s well-known slums are high-rise tenements and other “informal” housing types that contravene planning and building regulations. The city is undergoing a shift from low-density shacks to multi-storey tenements, and approximately 70 per cent of Nairobi residents live in single-room units in informal settlements and tenements. This market can be highly profitable: property investors can realize returns up to four times greater compared to selling formal mid- and high-income housing.

Latest blogs

Poverty is often defined by assessing income. But guest bloggers Sam Jones and Inge Tvedten say that using a wider lens can help to understand the social and political mechanisms that help to create and reproduce poverty.
Walking, cycling and using public transport are the main ways of getting around Indian cities. But as India's cities expand and car ownership increases, pedestrians are being marginalised – and their safety is being put at risk.
A paper in the latest issue of the journal Environment & Urbanization highlights how urban plans for adapting to climate change often leave out migrant populations living in informal settlements. Guest bloggers Eric Chu and Kavya Michael call for a rethink.

E&U @SAGE journals

Sister journal

E&U's sister journal  Medio Ambiente y Urbanizacion focusses on Latin America

E & U Latin America